Agricultural Heritage

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 183 - Fascinating piece of British Agricultural history

1st February 2007

We appeal to our web site readers to provide us with further detail on the company and on the implement. This cultivator is in remarkably good condition but we cannot remember where we got it from because it is certainly not a well-known manufacturer.

01
 
History - John Wilder
James Wilder (1789-1869) took on the Yield Hall Foundry in Reading in 1810. His sons, James and John inherited the business, and John gave his name to the later styling of the firm.
As well as general foundry work, this business became mainly a manufacturer of agricultural implements and machines. They were known especially for their chaff cutters and for harvesting implemenys. After the First World War the firm's pitch-pole hay gatherers and hay loaders gained it renewed celebrity.
The death of John Wilder in 1903 without male heirs led to the firm's being taken on by his cousins in Wallingford, who were in business as R. J. & H. Wilder, The Fish Foundry, Wallingford. In 1935 the two firms were merged as John Wilder Ltd.
 
Answers:
Subject: HTN 183 - Fascinating piece of British Agricultural history
Date: 06 February 2007 3:00:58 AM
To: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Joanna

I am am not an expert but regarding the request for info on the Wilder agri implement the following book & Web addresses may be of use

Men of Iron, story of John Wilder Ltd. foundry & ploughing engine...

http://www.steamscenes.org.uk/?pc=/engines/wilder/ploughing-engine/1/ http://www.steamploughclub.org.uk/index.htm


Cheers

Rupert Coomber

 
 
 
 

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 182 - More vintage farm equipment in line for restoration?

1st February 2007

I wonder if my turn in the restoration department will ever come?

 

01

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 181 - British tractor challenge for Wiltshire air ambulance and Wales air ambulance

1st February 2007

Saturday 20th January @ Lackham College Lacock Chippenham Wilts, thanks to Lyn Collingborn

The British Tractor Challenge 2006
Presentation of Cheques to Wiltshire & Wales Air Ambulance
Saturday 20th January 20074pm Saturday 20th January 2007 at Lackham College Chippenham Wilts

Chairman of the Tractor Challenge 2006, Mr Doug Newton, opens the presentation by welcoming all to Lackham College;
On behalf of the Challenge Committee he thanked:
Pete Murton of the 9th Supply regiment Buckley Barracks for the use of the airfield and their help and support.
Mr John Eavis and his family for the use of his field also the other local farmers whose land we used for parking etc.
Wiltshire Police, Matt Armstrong PS, from Malmsbury division, was totally unflappable and did everything in his power to make the event as safe and secure as possible with out taking the fun away, even when there was a threat that the M4 would come to a grinding halt he was still smiling.
Dave Hooker, whose large donation gave the challenge a great jump-start?
Bernie Fishlock, Whose field layout has now been adopted by other challenges worldwide.
John Dixon, of Lackham College who did not realise what he let himself in for, when he told John Collingborn, “no problem we restore a tractor every year”
Gill, Garth & Gary Wilson. From South Africa who came over for 10 day’s just to help and support the challenge, and did everything from empting the loo’s, to setting up the site.
Tractor & Machinery Magazine, who donated Matilda, a Fergie T20 for our raffle prize that we took around the country promoting the challenge.
Geoff Sheering, from Grapevine charity, who spent many, many hours chasing around the country, to make our outstanding DVD of the challenge the success it is.
All the companies, clubs, associations, and individuals, that supported and believed in us.
The people and transport companies, who brought load after load to the challenge, for no reward other that to be part of the greatest agricultural event this world has ever seen.

OUR SPONSORS, Richard Sivil of Vapormatic who has given more than we ever hoped for, not only with the parts to restore poor old George, but world wide advertising, promotion, and constant support to Lyn & John Collingborn and there team.
Each and every sponsor gave all they could to make this challenge the success it is. And for that we thank them all from the bottom of our hearts…………
Mr Chairman then handed over to Richard Sivil of Vapormatic, who spoke emotionally about the challenge, and how John Collingborn had phone him and said “ Vapormatic need’s to be involved in the rebuild of poor old George, an old Fordson Power Major, That had been given to the challenge by George Walker of Norfolk. And was in need of a little restoration? After which it would be the draw prize for a one lucky driver in the challenge. He will never get over the shock when his first saw poor old George at Lackham College.

Richard finished by saying that, everywhere he looked whilst he was taking part in the challenge driving Wyndham Mullins International 634 he could see smiling faces, seven months after the challenge, countrywide people are still reliving the challenge and still smiling…

Over to John Dixon
John Dixon of Lackham College spoke of the rebuild of poor old George, once again saying that John Collingborn was a good sales man, John C told him also, that he had a tractor that needed a little restoration!! When he met the challenge team at Pewsey show, Poor Old George was displayed on the lorry, “he say’s he felt his colour draining away as he first set eyes on this Fordson Power Major” Well he guessed that’s what it was once!! WHAT had he done!, In true British spirit.

On the 10th February 2006 at about 3am John Dixon started up poor old George to a round of applause from a team of Lackham student and lectures that had worked with out a stop for 20hour to
Restore poor old George to his former glory, what a sight.

John Dixon finished by saying “ that he felt a little emotional at the tractor challenge” and was very proud to be part of the tractor challenge.Page 2 The British Tractor Challenge 2006
Presentation of Cheques to Wiltshire & Wales Air Ambulance

 

01

Stephanie Evenden with Tracey Edwards from Wiltshire Air Ambulance By kind permission of Joseph Lewis.

 

02

John & Lyn Collingborn with Madalyn & Mervyn Thomas from Wales air ambulance With kind permission of Joseph Lewis

 

Saturday 20th January 2007
Cont;
Derek Taylor, the Commentator at the challenge, invited Tracey Edwards from Wiltshire Air Ambulance and Madelyn and Mervyn Thomas from Wales Air Ambulance to come forward to accept the cheques of the money raised on behalf of the British Tractor Challenge 2006.
The challenge secretary Mrs Stephanie Evenden presented both air ambulances with a cheque for £8,540.00 each..
Both charities gave a short thank you speech, and thanked each and everyone who supported the challenge in turn raising much needed money to keep the air ambulances flying.
Derek then presented Stephanie Evendon and Shirley Mullins with a bouquet of flowers to thank them for being Lynda’s left and right hand during the challenge…
Derek finished by thanking all for coming, also all that supported the event, John and Lynda Collingborn and their team.
The company known, as the British Tractor Challenge 2006 will now be closed,The British Tractor Challenge 2006 raised £58,394
Cost to stage the event £41,714
Donation to our two charities £16,680The Challenge also donated money to help rebuild burnt out children’s nursery in Hullavington village £500.00 to compensate for any inconvenience incurred during the event..

 

British Tractor Challenge 2006 - Statistics

Total registered tractors: 2141

Age of Tractors

03

 Age Graph

04

Avgerage age (mean): 1968Horsepower
Total HP 129,747
Average HP 61Miscellaneous statistics
Vintage Tractors (30yrs+) 1557
Ferguson T20s with plough 194

Manufacturer Totals

 05

 


Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 180 - Another teaser for our readers

1st February 2007

We could not for the life of ourselves work out what this machine does!

Our picture shows Terry Reilly, the General Manager of Sandstone, with this particular hand operated implement.

Any ideas?

Email the webmistress>>>

From: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Subject: I think I know what this implement is supposed to do!
Date: 03 February 2007 2:32:09 PM
To: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Reply-To: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Dink dit kan dalk 'n ou tef-saaier wees?

-----Original Message-----
From: Rhys Rolfe
Sent: 07 February 2007 03:39
To: joannewest
Subject: RE: Emailing: SSE Week 25th Jan 07 049, SSE Week 25th Jan 07 048

Dear Wilf,

Sorry this is an old Teff planter. The seed box fitted on the two handles,
and the plate with the holes in it was used to adjust the amount of seed
applied. The little curved arm at the end of the plate with the holes used
to fit into a chain which moved back and forth under the seeder box applying
the seed.

Best regards,

Rhys

01
 
02

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 164 - An exciting find by the vintage tractor section of the Sandstone Heritage Trust

5th December 2006

An exciting find by the vintage tractor section of the Sandstone Heritage Trust is a white model 2270 tractor dating back to the 1970's. This tractor was plucked from the jaws of the scrap dealer in a scrap yard in Potchefstroom. Thanks to a good friend of our, Okkie Yssel, who spotted it, it was purchased and immediately uplifted by Jan Fouche and moved to his premises where it is going to be mechanically checked and serviced.

The tractor will be left in as is original condition.
 
 

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 163 - Interesting tractor discovered in the platteland

5th December 2006

A Raba, manufactured in Hungary in 1983, is a big tractor and must have turned heads when it first came out to South Africa over 25-years ago. We would appreciate further information on this particular range of tractors.

We understand that only three of these were imported into South Africa.
 
01

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 162 - The Sandstone Heritage Trust brings out the oldies.

4th December 2006

At this time of the year there are many jobs around the farm which can be handled by reliable old tractors, such as the Field Marshall Series III. In this case it is planting cosmos for decorative purposes. Our photographs shows Charles Viljoen raking in the seed with an old type harrow.

Picture No. 77: In a barn adjacent to the field there is a wealth of Field Marshall spares. These are only some of the many Field Marshalls which the Sandstone Heritage Trust has accumulated over the years.

The Field Marshall is an extremely versatile machine and can switch duties in a few moments. After a day's work the Series III, which has hauled the seed and fertilizer to the lands, returns home. Having parked the tractor in the shed our web update photographer asked Charles, "Why don't you turn the machine off?"
Charles said, "I cannot bring myself to do it - it sounds too beautiful."

Field Marshall fans will know what he is talking about.
 
01
02
03
04
05
 
 

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 159 - Chris Wilson Reports from Lions River - 20 November 2006 - Marshall MP6 progress

20th November 2006

With the new hitch side plates fitted the existing bracket could be modified & repaired to work with the newly made drawbar, which attaches from the belly of the tractor as did the original. After measurements have been taken holes have to be drilled in the bracket to allow for different positions of the drawbar.
01


Gearing up for a big step forward, with the re-uniting of engine & chassis. The “bath tub” frame is cleaned, primed & painted prior to the engine being dropped in. Note the front of the gearbox with coupling fitted, and the steering box.

 

02


The engine sub assembly suspended and painted from underneath which will make the final painting much easier. Front & rear mounting brackets are in place, and the respective bolt holes have been cleaned and where necessary re-tapped.

03


The combined weight of the engine & clutch housing is excessive for the average engine crane, so a tractor mounted crane was utilized, which also provided the necessary height, as the engine has to be lifted over & dropped into the frame.

The tractor is a late 60’s JD 1020 which is in good original condition. The hydraulics particularly are working well and allow for precision movements with stability.
The weight however was enough to raise the front of the tractor so that the front wheels barely touched the ground!

04
05
06


With the engine safely in place the assembly can continue. First on is the head, which has previously been overhauled; valves & seats have been cut and the head skimmed.
Then the cam followers, push rods, rocker assembly & case could be assembled, all of which had been laboriously sorted, assessed & repaired from a heap of parts.
Valve clearances have been set.
With the rocker cover and all the side plates, breathers, and filler fitted most of the lube system was closed. The filter assembly was fitted with a new cartridge and the by-pass repaired. A jumper hose has been fitted in place of the oil cooler.
With the engine was received a jumble of different dipsticks, so the best fitting of these was selected. The correct amount of oil, according to the manual is 3 Gallons, so this amount was put into the sump. Naturally the marks on the dipstick did not tally with the level, so it was necessary to make a new mark. However before this could be done it was necessary to crank the engine to get oil into the filter etc, which required a starter motor.

07


The saga of the starter began a while ago when it was discovered that the original had disappeared.
The original was a CAV which would be very hard to find. However pre-war CAV had worked very closely with Bosch, and although this arrangement came to an abrupt halt in 1939, post-war CAV designs continued to be very similar to Bosch. This meant a good chance existed of matching something up.
Firstly a mounting bracket that fitted the engine adaptor plate was found lying in a jumble of bits at the back of an auto electrical workshop. Secondly a Bosch starter was obtained that matched the bracket. This has a very similar appearance to the original. Next a new pinion with the correct number of teeth was found, the starter overhauled & fitted with a new solenoid.

The fit is close – in fact some grinding had to be done – but it works well.

08
09
10


Now the engine could be turned. With no injectors fitted the cranking speed was probably close to idle, and within a short period of time the test gauge registered pressure.
This was a significant event, as due to the way the engine had been stripped and parts mixed up, despite care being taken there was an element of doubt regarding un-plugged galleries etc.
The reading was +- 400 kpa, which is close to the spec for full revs – but of course the oil was cold.
There is a relief valve which can be adjusted once the engine is running.

 

11


Showing the oil filter. The head is a Marshall part as it has provision for an engine oil cooler, which was not standard on the Leyland truck engine.
This cooler sits inside the frame close to the radiator and uses cooled water from the radiator to take heat from the oil. One very similar to the original has been located, and once the go ahead has been given it can be obtained, serviced and fitted with all the associated plumbing.

Note the short hose bridging the 2 ports in the meantime.

12


The curse of any restoration, broken bolts! On the LHS of the engine are 2 plates that give access to the water jacket. A cylinder casting can be seen inside. Quite why Leyland made provision for this access is not clear – it may be due to a casting technicality. In any case when the engine was stripped several of the retaining bolts which had corroded fast evidently twisted off. These broken studs had to be drilled out & re-tapped – in this case to 5/16th NC – except one that had to go to the next size up.
The overhauled water pump has been tested for fit – this too was missing and it’s a relief that it fits as there can be different pumps for different applications. This one came from a scrap Leyland Comet. The fan was obtained from a Leyland Hippo – bigger engine, but fortunately same fan!
The pump will be removed, sanded & primed before final fitting.

13


All cooling components fitted, but another setback! The radiator was received loose, but had been cleaned & checked at sometime apparently. A major leak manifested as shown, and unfortunately subsequent pressure tests revealed a myriad of tiny leaks indicating the tubes are wafer thin. This core is of an old pattern typical of the 50’s, so is probably the original. A re-core is vital to continuing the restoration.
A general view of the RHS of the engine. The Engine type & ser number on the tappet cover matches that stamped on the block, so it is original. Marshall fitted a breather and filler on the side of the engine as can be seen, whereas the Leyland truck had a filler on top. For some unknown reason somebody removed & lost whatever was on top of this engine so a spare breather has been fitted for the time being. After research a suitable replacement will be made.

While the original generator was a CAV and the one fitted is Lucas, it very close. It has been overhauled. Fortunately the original large pulley survived. The right belt has to be matched and a tension bracket made.

 

14


Typical of the type of small stuff that has gone missing that one only discovers on assembly are the special bushes in the injector pump drive. Fortunately in this case an old block was on hand from which to harvest these and other small bits. Note the exhauster for lorry airbrakes. The Marshall doesn’t have this; there is a spacer in its place.

15

Now attention is turned to the fuel system. At the heart is the injector pump. The original was well worn, and the cost of the parts would have been excessive, if they could have been located in the first place. Fortunately a re-conditioned unit was located in the UK and imported.
Timing this in-line pump is quite straightforward, using the “spill” method. A convenient flap gives access to a pointer which can be aligned with the “Inj” mark on the flywheel, (no 1 on compression). At this point fuel must just start to spill out of the no 1 port.

Provision is made for fine tuning which will be carried out when the whole fuel system is in place & bled.
At the rear of the pump is the pneumatic governor, which will be connected by 2 pipes to a butterfly on the inlet manifold. This manifold was also missing, and of course differs to that found on engines with a mechanical governor, fortunately one was found and has been repaired.

 

16
17


Naturally all the fuel lines, fittings etc, and one of the filter assemblies were missing. New lines will be made up using the components shown here. Many of these fittings had to be made up specially.

18


While much mechanical work remains, it is time to look ahead to the body work.
Panels have been sandblasted where necessary, and repaired. The front grille had the remains of a fine mesh which has been replaced by quality stainless steel.

Mudguards & nose cone have been professionally repaired. Whereas I normally abhor the use of body filler, these were badly pitted from acid rain and had to be filled. This tractor stood for many years to the east of Sasol’s oil from coal plant at Secunda, which is notorious for its acidic pollution.
Here the panels are being offloaded after repair, as well as the drawbar bracket.

19
20


The fuel tank is part of an assembly comprising dash, steering support, battery holder etc. This has been thoroughly cleaned, and painted prior to fitting.
Shown here is the underside which will obviously be in-accessible once the tank is fitted.

21


At this stage some of the detailing can be done. Shown here are the 2 fuel filter heads.

22


This area will largely be concealed by the fuel tank, so it has to be painted beforehand. The drive couplings (referred to as “Layrub” couplings in the parts book) incorporate rubber bushes which are in good shape.
The circular flange in the foreground covers the mounting for a belt pulley, which this tractor never had. Inside the box behind is where the pulley dog clutch & drive gears would have been fitted.

23


A small job time-wise but a big visual improvement – the fuel tank assembly is craned into place.

24


Some further work has also been done on the Allis B – while waiting for a new water pump ex USA which was held up by a lack of stock at the supplier, the mower was checked out. Here a broken mounting arm has a new shaft welded onto it.

25


The mower knife assembly needed re-alignment and some blade replacement. Setting up these sickle bar mowers is frustrating & time consuming.

26


Eventually the new pump arrived and has been fitted.

 

27
28


This enabled the tinwork, fuel system & cooling system to be assembled.

29

Note correct position of new temperature gauge. A new neck had to made up to accomodate this.
30

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 153 - Gerhard Wille, a real expert on vintage tractors, particularly Field Marshall and Lanz.

14th November 2006

Gerhard Wille was the original owner of Hoekfontein Farm where Sandstone Estates' main complex now resides. Gerhard is a great friend of ours, a wonderful personality, an excellent engineer, and a real expert on vintage tractors, particularly Field Marshall and Lanz.

Here is a picture from our archives showing Gerhard on a Sandstone Heritage Trust Lanz Bulldog taken about 1997 travelling along the old road on the way to Hoekfontein. The truck on the right is a mystery. Our investigations continues.
 
01

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 148 - Items for sale - beautiful old dam scoop

27 October 2006

One tends to forget that preservation is ongoing. Sandstone Estates is a broadly based preservation centre with an interest in all things mechanical, agricultural, steam, military etc.

This beautiful old original dam scoop has been made available to us by one of our neighbours near Fouriesburg. The plan is now to put it to good use, possibly using oxen
 
01

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 146 - Living preservation of vintage tractors

19th October 2006

The more we analyse how we can save money by using our heritage equipment, the more interesting it becomes. Maintenance of lawns and gardens is important to us and one of the things that we have done over the years is to spike our lawns in springtime. In fact, we had a special machine built.

However, the Estate's department were consistently using tractors which were far too powerful for the job and we have now deployed this beautiful little 1942 Farmall Cub which does the job immaculately.

Fully restored by Jannie du Toit in the Cape for the Villiersdorp Show, it has an electric start, is totally reliable, and is more than comfortable with this particular job. It does the tractor good as well.
 
01
 
 

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 144 - Chris Wilson Reports on the Marshall MP6, the Allis Chalmers B & the Fordson Aircraft Tug- 9th October 2006

10th October 2006

Work continues on the Marshall MP6.
The main frame has been thoroughly sanded & cleaned – photo 100-0592.

Having got the engine assembled to the point where it is ready to fit into the frame, the next task was to check the transmission.

Firstly the remaining oil was drained – photo 100-0589. As can be seen, what little oil there was was not in good shape- years of condensation & sludge had accumulated in the bottom of the casings.

The MP6 has various drain plugs for all the compartments, and good sized inspection covers on top to allow for thorough cleaning – photo 100-0597.
01
02
03
100-0592
100-0589
100-0597
At the same time it was possible to check the brakes. These are massive constricting bands, oil immersed, and because of the diameter of the drums are extremely efficient, while the oil gives excellent cooling & durability. The linings were in good shape, and there is plenty of adjustment. The bands are centralized by bolts protruding from underneath.

The all important crown wheel & pinion was found to be in excellent shape, with the correct amount of backlash etc – photo 100-0594.

A problem with the gearbox had been identified while towing the machine – it was obviously jammed in one gear. Removal of the gearbox cover revealed a misplaced selector. At the same time much superficial rust caused by condensation could be seen – photo 100-0597.

Since there had been a problem and also due to the presence of rust it was decided to remove the selector assemblies, check, repair & clean – photos 100-0596 & 0597. A small amount of wear was rectified, but it seems that the main problem was due to the cover having been removed and misplaced at some time.

The gears could be properly inspected at this stage, and apart from some staining are in good condition. The second & third motion shafts were correctly set up, but excessive end float on the first motion (Input) shaft was evident.
04
05
06
100-0594.
photo 100-0596
100-0597.

That this was an old problem could be seen from the fact that the clutch brake disc had been rubbing on the retaining bolts. However it was decided to get the setting right (.010” - .015”). This entailed removing the brake disc, and this revealed a surprising modification. Obviously at some stage the disc, which transmits all the engine power, had come loose and damaged the splines on the main shaft. To effect a repair the shaft had been machined down to a square, and a corresponding square boss welded into the disc.
photo - 100-0605.

This appears to have been done professionally, but nevertheless it is unusual to say the least to see power transmitted through a square drive, although come to think of it early heavy duty PTO drives were similar.
Great care will be taken to eliminate play using a high grade loctite. It is to be hoped that the shaft has not been weakened in the process.

Another discovery was that an important spacer between the disc and front bearing had become worn, presumably when the disc ran loose, and was also cracked – photo -100-0606. This had been welded, but had re-cracked. A new spacer is under construction.
A seal runs on this spacer which will also be replaced.

To obtain the correct end float shims had to be removed – the discarded shim pack can be seen in the picture.
The front axle and steering appeared to be ok, but checks revealed problems in the steering box and one front bearing, which fell out in bits on disassembly - photo -100-0609. One hub has broken or missing studs, and is having new studs & nuts made up. New bearings have been sourced. The kingpins are mounted on cup & cone bearings – a vast improvement on the usual bush arrangement – and even today usually only found on 4wd tractors.
07
08
09
100-0605.
100-0606.
100-0609.

The steering box has suffered from years of water ingress to the detriment of the shaft bearings. This type of specialized bearings can be difficult to find; fortunately they are identical to those used on John Deere 2cyl rowcrop tractors, and the bearings are readily available. photo -100-0607.
The steering draglink ends are worn, and this has been sent in for the end joints to be re-packed with high grade nylon.
The standard agricultural drawbar had long been discarded in favour of a straight pull from the rear housing. This had put serious strain on the side plates, which have been replaced – photo -100-0610.

A new drawbar tongue and securing pin under the belly have also been fabricated, photo -100-0611, and when these are in position the rear swinging bracket can measured and restored with it’s locating holes.
10
11
12
100-0607.
100-0610.
100-0611.
 
Allis Chalmers B
With rebuilt carburetor & magneto, repaired oil filter assembly, and attention to valves & oils, it was time to test the tractor. A suitable crank handle has been modified to fit, and a temporary fuel system rigged. After a considerable amount of cranking the engine burst into life. photos -100-0585 & 0586. Without a cooling system it could not be run for long obviously, but long enough to check oil pressure, which is good, and clutch and gearbox, which seem fine.

However a major oil leak showed up from the front crank seal. This was removed and replaced – photo -100-0587.
13
14
15
100-0585
100-0586
100-0587
 
16
One thing leads to another, and during the stripping process it was discovered that the front axle mountings, which screw into the block,
were stripped. The holes have been enlarged and re-tapped
to 9/16” NC. – photo - 100-0588.
.
 
Fordson Aircraft Tug
Work on this has focused on removing years of grime and rust, treating rust spots, and sourcing spares –photo - 100-0612.
17

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

Tractor inventory December 2005 - Tractors awaiting attention at Sandstone

<< Back to the article

69


 







 

 

 

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 140 - Garth Wilson, a South African who visited the UK Tractor Challenge sent us some pics!

2nd October 2006

Garth Wilson, a South African who visited the UK Tractor Challenge, has very kindly sent us a comprehensive set of photographs. We are greatly indebted to him for this and we publish these photos herewith.

As a reminder the British now hold the Record for the most number of tractors ploughing in a field in one time (this includes modern, classic and vintage which is a slightly different configuration to that which Sandstone Estates initiated in 1999 and 2002). Nonetheless, a very excellent effort by the British challenge team.
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 128 - Wes-Kaap "Veteraan Trekker-En Enjinklub Magazine

23rd August 2006

Nuusbrief Nr. 28 - Julie 2006 "Kyk wat het van The Great 100 Working geword"

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 127 - Marshall MP6, ser no 6740184 & other projects at LionsRiver – by Chris Wilson.

23rd August 2006

 
Marshall MP6, ser no 6740184.

The Marshall MP6 was Marshall’s last wheeled tractor, at least until the acquisition of Leyland’s tractor business in the 80’s. After the demise of the MP6 Marshalls concentrated on Track Marshall crawlers. This plus the very low production figure of 197 makes the MP6 extremely collectable.

By the early 50’s the well accepted & reliable single cylinder Field Marshall had become an obsolete design and was due for replacement.

Marshalls decided on a big (for the day) replacement, and the MP6 was conceived. It was primarily designed to take on the increasingly high horse power American tractors in Marshall’s traditional export markets (the “P” stood for Prairie); and to replace the Field Marshall in it’s domestic role as a Threshing Contractor’s machine.

Unfortunately it succeeded in neither. Combines were making threshing drums obsolete, electricity rendered most belt work a thing of the past, and it was some three times more expensive than the average tractor on the British market. Overseas the absence of a 3pt lift made it virtually a non starter. Times had moved on and Marshalls had not read the market correctly. As a result only 197 were built over a 6 yr period.
Records show 8 were shipped to South Africa. Of these 2 are known to have survived, 184 and another restored example.
Below is an example of a superbly restored MP6, not unlike Sandstone's model
01
Both of these were found in industrial yellow paint and had massive industrial hitches.

6740184 has large industrial rear tyres, and it is known that it was sold originally to the Transvaal Roads Dept, where it probably pulled a grid or sheepsfoot roller.

A farmer from the Bethal area purchased it on a dispersal auction and used it for heavy cultivation, finally laying it aside some time in the 80’s due to a lack of hydraulics.

Discovered by Sandstone in 1996 it was first moved to Bloemfontein & the engine removed.
02
An unfortunate chain of events saw the engine totally stripped, parts mixed with another similar engine, and some crucial parts lost.

Eventually everything was moved to Chris Wilson at LionsRiver for restoration.
The challenge!

The engine fitted to the MP6 was the Leyland 350, a common truck engine in it’s day. However many parts differed ; Marshalls fitted their own high capacity aluminum sump & oil cooler and the exhaust manifold was designed for the upright outlet.

The original engine and a Leyland 370 – similar but with with a larger bore (and built to a lorry spec) had been stripped simultaneously, and the parts had become mixed up.
03
The photo shows all the small parts after sorting- a laborious process of reference & comparisons.

Despite the popularity of the engine in it’s day, new parts & other engines in anything remotely like a usable condition proved impossible to find.

Truck scrapyards yielded vital parts such as the correct inlet manifold for a pneumaticly governed injector pump and pully damper, while Crawfords in the UK have supplied a re-built injector pump; and many other parts are coming from them.
Ads were placed for a complete engine in the UK, but follow up investigations were not re-assuring.
04
Preparing the Crankshaft:

The crank was well within wear specs but required a professional polish. Leyland employed an unusual method of combating engine oil sludge formation.

The oils of the day were vastly inferior to todays, and quickly broke down under use forming a thick carbon sludge – resulting in severe engine failure.

The Leyland 350 has hollow big end journals with a through bolt holding 2 plugs in position.
05
Presumably the centrifugal force would force the heavier carbon deposits into these cavities where they would be trapped and kept away from the circulating oil – hence the term sludge traps.

The ones on our crank were full of a very thick black goo some of which had hardened and had to be chiseled out.
06
Assembly begins. Of the 2 engines one had suffered a bad lube failure, running bearings.

However the original crankshaft & block were in salvageable condition.

After extensive cleaning the block cylinder liners are honed, and the re-conditioned crankshaft placed in position using new bearing shells.
07
Assembly well under way.
With the crank in place the next job was to fit the pistons. The original pistons & con rods had gone missing, but a set in good condition had been obtained.
Rings were manufactured specially by Cords in Durban – unfortunately no longer in existence.
The 370 pistons were unusable and the conrods differed by not having an oil spray jet for piston cooling.
New bearing shells are fitted and the big end tensions set.
The Camshaft and bushes were in good shape. The best timing gears were selected and fitted, and the timing set. The oil pump needed little attention besides cleaning, but illustrates how tricky mixing & matching parts can be.

The 370 obviously had a shallower sump than the MP6 version, and correspondingly the cast iron suction neck which also forms the base plate of the sump is shorter.
The difference was spotted by putting the parts side by side and the correct one fitted. Failure to observe this could have been disastrous.

Finally the timing cover was fitted with a new seal and the pulley with the all important damper fitted.
At the rear Leyland employed a rope seal.

Woven rope of the correct thickness was obtained and carefully cut to length. The adaptor plate which is a Marshall part, not Leyland was then bolted into place.
08
Clutch & pulley drive housing.

The clutch is a Borg & Beck, probably a standard lorry unit of the day. The flywheel has been skimmed as has the pressure face plate, and the drive plate re-lined. New springs have been fitted to the pressure plate.

A new release bearing was obtained, but on fitting it was found that there was excessive play between the carrier & the tube, an unusual occourence resulting in serious mis-alignment. Examination revealed that a nylon bush had melted – it is assumed the release bearing began seizing and overheated. This has been re-bushed.
The flywheel has been fitted with a new pilot bearing, and finally the clutch put together & lined up.

The clutch housing is also the transfer box for the pulley – which 6740184 appeared never to have had.
Strangely a bevel gear and engagement collar are in place – unused.

Besides a lot of dirt the unit was in good shape.
Subsequently the housing has been fitted to the engine and the whole sub-assembly turned right way up.

The next phase will involve fitting the engine to the chassis, thereafter other components such as the cylinder head and pump – already re-conditioned – can be fitted.
09
Engine mountings.
The MP6 has a strange mounting arrangement. Instead of forming a part of the chassis, being bolted directly, or being cushioned by rubber mountings Marshall secured the engine by 3 metal to metal pins & bushes. Obviously over the years the engine torque produced movement as there was considerable wear on these. Shown is the front mounting & one of the rear, after re-building.
 
Other Sandstone projects @ LionsRiver.
Allis Chalmers B

This steel wheeled American built tractor is in for a re-furbishment rather than a restoration. It requires attention to the cooling system, magneto, carb amongst other things.

However as always when dealing with 50yr old plus machinery the unexpected occours.

The water pump has been found to be leaking and has had to be removed & sent off for repair.
10
Also while changing the oil filter it was noted that the pewter mounting base was cracked through and had been “temporarily” fixed. This will have to receive attention.
Fordson Super Major Tug.

After stripping to quote, an order has been recently received to continue with this project.

Subsequent to this photo a thorough cleaning & sandpapering has taken place, with rust spots being treated with etch red oxide. A number of parts have been ordered from overseas.
11
Current projects at Sandstone.
 
Ferguson TED
No tractor collecection would be complete without an example of Harry Ferguson’s brainchild, the TE20or “Vaaljapie”. Sandstone was fortunate to aquire one recently in a very clean original condition.
Following a service & clean up it started & ran well, but has absolutely no brakes. This has safety implications and the brakes were stripped to reveal serious oil contamination.
The cause of this is seal failure allowing transmission oil to leak out.
Unfortunately thistractor is an early version which is prone to this failure, and is also extremely difficult to repair as the seal sits inside a collar which virtually has to be destroyed in the removal process.
Ferguson expert Dennis Field has been contacted. He offers an update kit which can be fitted easily and is much more effective.

A quote has been submitted and an order is awaited.
12
13
Fordson Super Major
A beautifully original example of a classic. Whilst a best seller in it’s day few remain in the country as most were re-exported as used units due to their popularity elsewhere.

The earlier but similar Major generally did not have live PTO & hydraulics, so was not so sought after.

This tractor originating from Frere has been thoroughly serviced and has had it’s starter & other electrical components overhauled and is now a good runner again, although worn rings make a midwinter cold start difficult.

Some electrical parts outstanding, eg solenoid, quote submitted awaiting order.
14
 
 

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 120 - The baling of bio-mass goes on at Sandstone virtually all year round.

4th August 2006

We have been baling continuously since January and now have in excess of 10,000 round bales in stock. In our search for energy efficiency and in our endeavours to find alternative fuel sources we regularly use machines that do not necessarily use diesel. This picture shows a 1920 Marshall Agricultural Tractor doing a normal day's work, together with a robust Massey Ferguson 95.

The 95 is a powerful tractor and to purchase a tractor new in that horsepower range would cost well in excess of R150,000. A tractor like this was acquired and completely rebuilt for a fraction of that amount. The Marshall Agricultural tractor, which belongs to Philip Upshall of Yeovil, UK, was sent out to Sandstone Estates for a few years on loan and displayed agricultural qualifications in all areas. It has gone back to England but has been replaced by a 1910 McLaren Agricultural Engine currently undergoing a full rebuild by Keith Stevens of Howick.
 
01
02
03
04
 

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 116 - Tractor & Machinery Magazine - Vol.12 Issue.10 - "Record breaking Emerson Brantingham"

2nd August 2006

"Wilfred Mole tells the story of a tractor that is a veteran of both long-distance travel and record attempts, and is now set to appear at the next challenge in Ireland, 2007.
02
03
04