Agricultural Heritage

Heritage - News

To agricultural machinery preservationists - remember our web site is your web site.

We would like to wish all at Sandstone a wonderful 2008.  Looking forward to getting together soon.
This picture shows that I was not doing nothing during the holidays.  I finished restoring my 1948 John Deere AR and I recently took it for a few runs through the streets of Heilbron.
Yours,
Louis Boshoff

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Another year has gone past, and Emile Cronje and the Southern Cape Branch of the West Cape Tractor & Engine Club have held their seventh concecutive Old Time Harvest Day. Hennie Richter, Secretary of the whole West Cape Club made the point that Emile and Co didn't invent the concept, but they have certainly perfected them! Consider that almost all of the big harvesting equipment belongs to Emile, and the work and expense involved in collecting, restoring and displaying it, must be enormous.

He has become a magnet for people wishing to watch the equipment working, and also to people wishing to donate machinery, knowing that it stands a good chance of being restored and shown working. Every year there seems to be something new to demonstrate, and this time was no exception. Thys Swart, collector and farmer from Swellendam has dispersed his well-known collection of mostly Lanz tractors, and he has donated his extremely rare Sunshine self-propelled Header-harvester to the West Cape Club. Where better for it to be kept and displayed, than with the Emile Cronje Brakfontein Collection?

There was a large crowd of spectators as usual, and it was great, but in a way, distracting from the main events, to be catching up with old friends. I had been looking forward to meeting Manie Muller all year. He is another Swellendam farmer, but the important point is that he was born and brought up only a few hundred yards from the Compagnes Drift Mill, which I'm restoring. We have made an arrangement to meet at the Mill on a Saturday early in the new year, where hopefully he can give answers to some of our riddles.

It was also great to meet the Crowther family from Oakhurst Mill (and farm) in Wilderness. Jake reported that he has repaired damage to the roof of their well-known pelton wheel-powered threshing and milling set-up. While no plans are in place to restore the machinery in the immediate future, the situation is stable and he has arranged for the place to be professionally fumigated soon, to arrest the effect of wood borers. The Mill, Pelton Wheel and Murray & Banff threshing machine are described in Chester Staples' recently published book Mills of Southern Africa.

As usual, the day began with demonstrations of traditional harvesting methods using sickles, scythes and matjiesriet, the locally grown reed, which after bruising, is used to tie the sheaves. It was good to see the old timers, still fighting fit, getting stuck in as if they were 50 years younger! Very soon, the three reaper-binders came in and showed us the incredible difference this invention from 1841 must have made to grain farming and food supplies. This must have had the same effect on the Milling industry.

Sheaves were then collected and both the blikbakke (tin mills), IH and Massey Harris, were demonstrated, followed by demonstrations on the stationary balers. After lunch, a short ceremony was held, officially handing over the Sunshine Header, which was then demonstrated, Emile driving, Thys on the bagging platform.

1. Sunshine Auto-Header in action, Emile Cronje at the controls.

 

2. Stephen Sokolic and his Farmers Friend engine belted up to his International Harvester Gyromill producing stone ground meal.

3. Demo of the use of the scythe and locally grown matjiesriet for binding the sheaves.

 

4. The towed pick-up baler, with seats for the two operators who have to insert and tie the wires. Above the machine can be seen a tube with the prepared wires.

 

5. McCormick WI industrial tractor from behind. Note the heavy duty hitch and lack of PTO and 3-point arms.

6. The John Deere 55 Combine Harvester. This bagger machine is what the Stationary Engine team went out into the land with!

 

7. Feeding the McCormick threshing machine from a trailer behind this immaculate Ford Bluebottle.

8. Emile driving an Allis Chalmers tractor, towing his Gleaner self-powered harvester, which is powered by a Wisconsin V4 engine.

 

9. Engine side view of the Sunshine Auto-Header of 1934.

10. Publicity picture of the same machine from the 1934 Sunshine Auto Header catalogue

 

Then the early combine harvesters were started up in turn and went out into the land. The Stationary Engine Team of Derick Kleynhans, Peter Boast and I landed up on the bagging platform of a Green Machine and found our work cut out to fill, sew up and tip the bags. Derick was seeing how full he could make the bags and how difficult he could make it for me to sew them up with the remaining bag! Once the land was cleared, at one stage there were ten of these old monsters gulping through the Korog (triticale), the pick-up machines being preceeded by Cockshutt platsnyer (swather), the hard work began!

First we loaded the bags on to Emile's immaculate Chev lorry, until its springs started looking flat. Then we took a tractor and wagon out and loaded that to capacity. What next? All that was left was the bulk-trailer. Ever tried loading a full bag over the high sides of one of them? However, we developed a system with three people, two lifting and one pushing, and soon that trailer was also filling up. One of the lads was actually catching the bags and putting them down in their places! We were shown last year the technique for the two lifters: you make one continuous lift, stand up and throw from the ground to the trailer, no wasted energy swinging the bag!

Before packing up, however, there was still some threshing to do. Another trailer-full of sheaves had been brought in after the demo's. Most of the people had gone, so now we had an opportunity to do it hands-on, changing bags on the grader and watching the grain as it came from the sieves. The first class grain was coming out very cleanly, just a few ears (and bugs) were coming through. I would have liked to put a bag of this through the Stamford at Compagnes Drift, pity it was korog!

Just when we thought it was all over, Emile casually mentiuoned 'more sheaves out in the land'....... we went out and found a cache of another fully-loaded trailer! These we collected and fed through the machine. This time I had the opportunity to feed the machine, standing on the trailer nearest the 'knives', a health and safety nightmare! It was another technique to learn, to feed the machine evenly, ears first, with one person at the far end of the feed chute, throwing in for all he's worth, the one closest to the machine filling the gaps in between. It's hard work!

It had been hard work loading the bags and doing the last of the threshing. There was still a catch! Peter, Derick and Stephen Sokolic had brought engines, the latter had brought his IH Gyromill which had been stopping the crowds while he was demonstrating. With our last reserves of energy, we got these loaded, mostly IH pigs (I think Peter's 5-HP must be pregnant!) and JD E's.

Then 2½ hrs home! A quick stop at Derick's for a pocket of his potatoes broke the trip nicely! We are looking forward to the Southern Cape Club hosting next year's Annual Show, preparations are already in motion!

Another year has gone past, and Emile Cronje and the Southern Cape Branch of the West Cape Tractor & Engine Club have held their seventh concecutive Old Time Harvest Day. Hennie Richter, Secretary of the whole West Cape Club made the point that Emile and Co didn't invent the concept, but they have certainly perfected them! Consider that almost all of the big harvesting equipment belongs to Emile, and the work and expense involved in collecting, restoring and displaying it, must be enormous.

He has become a magnet for people wishing to watch the equipment working, and also to people wishing to donate machinery, knowing that it stands a good chance of being restored and shown working. Every year there seems to be something new to demonstrate, and this time was no exception. Thys Swart, collector and farmer from Swellendam has dispersed his well-known collection of mostly Lanz tractors, and he has donated his extremely rare Sunshine self-propelled Header-harvester to the West Cape Club. Where better for it to be kept and displayed, than with the Emile Cronje Brakfontein Collection?

There was a large crowd of spectators as usual, and it was great, but in a way, distracting from the main events, to be catching up with old friends. I had been looking forward to meeting Manie Muller all year. He is another Swellendam farmer, but the important point is that he was born and brought up only a few hundred yards from the Compagnes Drift Mill, which I'm restoring. We have made an arrangement to meet at the Mill on a Saturday early in the new year, where hopefully he can give answers to some of our riddles.

It was also great to meet the Crowther family from Oakhurst Mill (and farm) in Wilderness. Jake reported that he has repaired damage to the roof of their well-known pelton wheel-powered threshing and milling set-up. While no plans are in place to restore the machinery in the immediate future, the situation is stable and he has arranged for the place to be professionally fumigated soon, to arrest the effect of wood borers. The Mill, Pelton Wheel and Murray & Banff threshing machine are described in Chester Staples' recently published book Mills of Southern Africa.

As usual, the day began with demonstrations of traditional harvesting methods using sickles, scythes and matjiesriet, the locally grown reed, which after bruising, is used to tie the sheaves. It was good to see the old timers, still fighting fit, getting stuck in as if they were 50 years younger! Very soon, the three reaper-binders came in and showed us the incredible difference this invention from 1841 must have made to grain farming and food supplies. This must have had the same effect on the Milling industry.

Sheaves were then collected and both the blikbakke (tin mills), IH and Massey Harris, were demonstrated, followed by demonstrations on the stationary balers. After lunch, a short ceremony was held, officially handing over the Sunshine Header, which was then demonstrated, Emile driving, Thys on the bagging platform.

1. Sunshine Auto-Header in action, Emile Cronje at the controls.

 

2. Stephen Sokolic and his Farmers Friend engine belted up to his International Harvester Gyromill producing stone ground meal.

3. Demo of the use of the scythe and locally grown matjiesriet for binding the sheaves.

 

4. The towed pick-up baler, with seats for the two operators who have to insert and tie the wires. Above the machine can be seen a tube with the prepared wires.

 

5. McCormick WI industrial tractor from behind. Note the heavy duty hitch and lack of PTO and 3-point arms.

6. The John Deere 55 Combine Harvester. This bagger machine is what the Stationary Engine team went out into the land with!

 

7. Feeding the McCormick threshing machine from a trailer behind this immaculate Ford Bluebottle.

8. Emile driving an Allis Chalmers tractor, towing his Gleaner self-powered harvester, which is powered by a Wisconsin V4 engine.

 

9. Engine side view of the Sunshine Auto-Header of 1934.

10. Publicity picture of the same machine from the 1934 Sunshine Auto Header catalogue

 

Then the early combine harvesters were started up in turn and went out into the land. The Stationary Engine Team of Derick Kleynhans, Peter Boast and I landed up on the bagging platform of a Green Machine and found our work cut out to fill, sew up and tip the bags. Derick was seeing how full he could make the bags and how difficult he could make it for me to sew them up with the remaining bag! Once the land was cleared, at one stage there were ten of these old monsters gulping through the Korog (triticale), the pick-up machines being preceeded by Cockshutt platsnyer (swather), the hard work began!

First we loaded the bags on to Emile's immaculate Chev lorry, until its springs started looking flat. Then we took a tractor and wagon out and loaded that to capacity. What next? All that was left was the bulk-trailer. Ever tried loading a full bag over the high sides of one of them? However, we developed a system with three people, two lifting and one pushing, and soon that trailer was also filling up. One of the lads was actually catching the bags and putting them down in their places! We were shown last year the technique for the two lifters: you make one continuous lift, stand up and throw from the ground to the trailer, no wasted energy swinging the bag!

Before packing up, however, there was still some threshing to do. Another trailer-full of sheaves had been brought in after the demo's. Most of the people had gone, so now we had an opportunity to do it hands-on, changing bags on the grader and watching the grain as it came from the sieves. The first class grain was coming out very cleanly, just a few ears (and bugs) were coming through. I would have liked to put a bag of this through the Stamford at Compagnes Drift, pity it was korog!

Just when we thought it was all over, Emile casually mentiuoned 'more sheaves out in the land'....... we went out and found a cache of another fully-loaded trailer! These we collected and fed through the machine. This time I had the opportunity to feed the machine, standing on the trailer nearest the 'knives', a health and safety nightmare! It was another technique to learn, to feed the machine evenly, ears first, with one person at the far end of the feed chute, throwing in for all he's worth, the one closest to the machine filling the gaps in between. It's hard work!

It had been hard work loading the bags and doing the last of the threshing. There was still a catch! Peter, Derick and Stephen Sokolic had brought engines, the latter had brought his IH Gyromill which had been stopping the crowds while he was demonstrating. With our last reserves of energy, we got these loaded, mostly IH pigs (I think Peter's 5-HP must be pregnant!) and JD E's.

Then 2½ hrs home! A quick stop at Derick's for a pocket of his potatoes broke the trip nicely! We are looking forward to the Southern Cape Club hosting next year's Annual Show, preparations are already in motion!

Heritage - Rail - News

Soya Planting

19th November 2007 - Updated 17th December 2007

Click here to jump down the page to the latest update

The 24 hour a day Soya planting program continues at Sandstone and nearly 800 Ha has already been planted. With a let up in the rain the progress has been steady and the planting should be completed within the prescribed planting period.

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 Soya Drop Update mid December 2007

 
Nature played its part and allowed Sandstone to finish planting the planned 1000 Hectare Soya crop. Immediately thereafter it began rainy on a daily basis and has not stopped since. The farm has received 148mm since 17 November, which is when the last seed was put into the ground, and the continuing wet conditions are excellent for the Soya.
 
Unfortunately nature was not going to let us have it all our own way and a hail storm was let loose on about 90 Hectares of the newly planted lands around Grootdraai and the Game Camp...

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The early prognosis was that the young plants, having had their growth tips knocked back, would probably not make it. It appears however that the plants decided that this was not to the case. A week later, perhaps due to the rain and nursery like conditions many of the plants have started to shoot new leaves and the rows are beginning to green up again...

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What is also interesting is that in the lands that were hit by hail, which were the last to be planted, we have noticed that new plants are still appearing as well which indicates that some of the seedling had not yet reached the surface when the hail hit. While the 90 odd Hectares may not recover to their full potential there is no doubt that we will get a harvest from these lands, as to how big only time will tell.
 
On the northern part of the farm where the majority of the crop was planted the Soya is looking fantastic and the rows are well established and a bumper crop is expected...

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Those lands that had not been burnt by the rampant fires, due to dry condition through the winter, offered the new plants some protection from the heavy rains...

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Conditions remain very wet (as above) and there was a lot of water lying in the lands we have thankfully had during the last week some sunny days and while the lands are very wet there is no danger of the lands becoming saturated and there have been no wash aways.

 
The farm can only but benefit from the current rainy conditions. The water table will have recovered to such an extent that the planned wheat planting for next year looks very promising.
 

Click here to jump down the page to the latest update

The 24 hour a day Soya planting program continues at Sandstone and nearly 800 Ha has already been planted. With a let up in the rain the progress has been steady and the planting should be completed within the prescribed planting period.

 
Nature played its part and allowed Sandstone to finish planting the planned 1000 Hectare Soya crop. Immediately thereafter it began rainy on a daily basis and has not stopped since. The farm has received 148mm since 17 November, which is when the last seed was put into the ground, and the continuing wet conditions are excellent for the Soya.
 
Unfortunately nature was not going to let us have it all our own way and a hail storm was let loose on about 90 Hectares of the newly planted lands around Grootdraai and the Game Camp...

The early prognosis was that the young plants, having had their growth tips knocked back, would probably not make it. It appears however that the plants decided that this was not to the case. A week later, perhaps due to the rain and nursery like conditions many of the plants have started to shoot new leaves and the rows are beginning to green up again...

 
What is also interesting is that in the lands that were hit by hail, which were the last to be planted, we have noticed that new plants are still appearing as well which indicates that some of the seedling had not yet reached the surface when the hail hit. While the 90 odd Hectares may not recover to their full potential there is no doubt that we will get a harvest from these lands, as to how big only time will tell.
 
On the northern part of the farm where the majority of the crop was planted the Soya is looking fantastic and the rows are well established and a bumper crop is expected...

Those lands that had not been burnt by the rampant fires, due to dry condition through the winter, offered the new plants some protection from the heavy rains...

 

 

Conditions remain very wet (as above) and there was a lot of water lying in the lands we have thankfully had during the last week some sunny days and while the lands are very wet there is no danger of the lands becoming saturated and there have been no wash aways.

 
The farm can only but benefit from the current rainy conditions. The water table will have recovered to such an extent that the planned wheat planting for next year looks very promising.
 

Click here to jump down the page to the latest update

The 24 hour a day Soya planting program continues at Sandstone and nearly 800 Ha has already been planted. With a let up in the rain the progress has been steady and the planting should be completed within the prescribed planting period.

 
Nature played its part and allowed Sandstone to finish planting the planned 1000 Hectare Soya crop. Immediately thereafter it began rainy on a daily basis and has not stopped since. The farm has received 148mm since 17 November, which is when the last seed was put into the ground, and the continuing wet conditions are excellent for the Soya.
 
Unfortunately nature was not going to let us have it all our own way and a hail storm was let loose on about 90 Hectares of the newly planted lands around Grootdraai and the Game Camp...

The early prognosis was that the young plants, having had their growth tips knocked back, would probably not make it. It appears however that the plants decided that this was not to the case. A week later, perhaps due to the rain and nursery like conditions many of the plants have started to shoot new leaves and the rows are beginning to green up again...

 
What is also interesting is that in the lands that were hit by hail, which were the last to be planted, we have noticed that new plants are still appearing as well which indicates that some of the seedling had not yet reached the surface when the hail hit. While the 90 odd Hectares may not recover to their full potential there is no doubt that we will get a harvest from these lands, as to how big only time will tell.
 
On the northern part of the farm where the majority of the crop was planted the Soya is looking fantastic and the rows are well established and a bumper crop is expected...

Those lands that had not been burnt by the rampant fires, due to dry condition through the winter, offered the new plants some protection from the heavy rains...

 

 

Conditions remain very wet (as above) and there was a lot of water lying in the lands we have thankfully had during the last week some sunny days and while the lands are very wet there is no danger of the lands becoming saturated and there have been no wash aways.

 
The farm can only but benefit from the current rainy conditions. The water table will have recovered to such an extent that the planned wheat planting for next year looks very promising.
 

Heritage - News

Wanted - Old Implements

11th September 2007

The Sandstone Heritage Trust is unusual in the sense that it collects and restores old farm implements. Our plan is to try to put together as comprehensive a cross-section of implements as might have been in use on South African farms over the past 100-years. If you know of any old rusty implements lying around please let us know before the scrap dealer gets them. Please contact Mike Myers on 082 990 1492.

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Heritage - News

Lagerplaats Dam

11th September 2007

7th April 2008


During 2007 the dam wall was raised at Lagerplaats dam... in additional other remedial work was done. Here is the end result.

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11th September 2007


It is good when a plan comes together...

We have covered the construction of the new dam wall and causeway at Lagerplaats Dam on our web site. A feature of this construction was the use of ancient earth moving plant and machinery, such as our 1939 Scammell Dump Truck. Anyway, the project is completed, the dam is nearly full, and our pictures tell the story.

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Heritage - News

How far back can your mind reach?

25th August 2007

The Sandstone Heritage Trust has recently received a very original ox wagon of the type used by the earliest pioneers who moved northwards from the Cape over 200-years ago.  While our heritage activities are very often perceived to be preoccupied by steam and by vintage and classic agricultural machinery we actually aspire to reach even further back.  The fact that we have trained Afrikaner oxen to work with a wagon like this supports our living heritage philosophy in a very significant way.

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Heritage - News

Oom Jannie does it again!

23rd August 2007

Oom Jannie du Toit
, who was single-handedly responsible for restoring virtually all the tractors in the International Farmall and McCormick Deering collection at the Sandstone Heritage Trust, has done it again.

Long after retiring to the coast he is still more than capable in his 70's of restoring a tractor. Here is his latest bit of handiwork. A beautifully restored Farmall Cub but with a unique grader blade feature. This is certainly a grader with a tiny carbon footprint.

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Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 213 - The Sandstone Heritage Trust has two Star drilling machines... perhaps its time to restore them?

5th June 2007

 
Our thanks to ANDY SELFE for these wonderful old pictures.

Here's a blow-up of a tiny snapshot of the Star (?) drilling rig that Andy got from the late oom Niel Loubser's belongings.
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I think that's the steam version and that the engine is behind and to the right of the steel tower. He told me years ago that it is his father Gysbert Loubser in the dark clothes, and that the girl was a miss Beukes. The drilling was going on on oom Gys' property, Dewhurst, just beyond my workshop on the LHS. This picture below I've had for some time.
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Two Freestate micrometers hanging from the machine, I see ;-) He couldn't remember the name of the driller.

There are several pictures of this towed harvester.
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I think he said that it was John Deere, and that it was particularly wide (17 '?) for its time. It was working in the Caledon area.

Impressive load behind a Johnny Popper, 'mied pak' or stacking the sheaves.
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Oom Niel had a terrible stammer, so add that to the fact he spoke Afrikaans, I always found him difficult to understand. But his daughter-in-law says he was always excited when I came to work on tractors, etc on the farm and always enjoyed coming to the workshop and 'helping' me, and never missed a chance to bring out a tray with coffee. I always used to rag him about the great 'service at this Cafe', referring to the fact that he owned the Bio-cafe in the village when we were at school!

His dad also owned the Forest Hotel here in the village, and amongst oom Niel's things have surfaced all the plans for the hotel, along with a brochure for the hotel saying it was AA & RAC approved, and a menu!

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 212 - It's countdown time for the huge Trator event taking place at Cooley

31st May 2007


It's countdown time for the huge Trator event taking place at Cooley (Between Dublin and Belfast) on Aug 5 2007.

South Africa will be well represented. The Sandstone Heritage Trust will be exhibiting 5 tractors. Our picture shows our John Deere Hi -crop 60 arriving in Europe. We are happy to support an event which if succesful will see more than 2400 pre 1977 tractors working together to break the world record which has become an institutionalised International Event, which originally started in South Africa back in 1999!

>>>For full details check http://www.cooleyvintagefestival.ie/entryform.htm

You are invited to join the South African delegation competing in the World Vintage and Classic Tractor event in Ireland on 5th August 2007. Known as the Cooley Vintage Festival this event will attempt to place more than 2,400 pre 1977 tractors in one field at one time to break the World Record. As is internationally known this event was started in 1999 at Sandstone Estates in the Eastern Free State at an event known as the Great 100 Working.
The Cooley web site is www.cooleyvintagefestival.ie. Our own web site www.sandstone-estates.com is also being updated regularly with details of this event.

If you would like to come and wave the flag for South Africa join us for the day.

Yours,

Wilfred Mole
 
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Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 211 - A glimpse of our rich agricultural Heritage

With thanks to Andy Selfe, here are the two postcards he was given by the son of the old man who passed away a few months ago, an Oom Niel Loubser, Grandson of L.H. Fick, Ysbrandskop, Caledon. He was an agent for Ransomes Sims and Jefferies, until the agency was taken over by I. Newmark.
 
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This came to me from oom Niel Loubser, grandson of Ransomes Agent for the Caledon (Cape) area, L H Fick, of the farm Ysbrandskop, near Caledon.
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Regarding a date, James Walton's book 'Portable Corn-mills in South Africa' states that when L H Fick died in 1928, J A Goodwyn, a director of Ransomes Sims and Jefferies wrote to S Fick, a son of L H Fick:

'Referring to the trade which was done in the Caledon district in our Thrashing Machinery by the late F (sic) H Fick, after due consideration we have decided that our interests in that district must be placed in the hands of a merchant, and we have therefore appointed Mr I Newmark, who we understand co-operated with Mr L H Fick for many years, as our Agent for Thrashing Machines for the provinces of Caledon, Bredasdorp and Swellendam.

'In advising you of this arrangement, we should like to take the opportunity of expressing to you our high esteem in which we held your late father, and the appreciation we shall always retain of his splendid efforts in the trade of our machinery.'

There are records of Ransomes machinery being despatched to L H Fick, for example Portable Mill No 1467, still at Stormsvlei near Swellendam, as early as 1903.

The inscription on this printer's block is 'Ransomes, Sims and Jefferies', the name that the firm assumed in 1884. So we can assume that the block was made between 1884 and 1928. Perhaps someone can be more specific, regarding the unusual positioning of a Pickering type governor at the flywheel end of the cylinder?

The South African Agents for Ransomes Sims and Jefferies were (from Walton's book):
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Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 208 - Offloading the container en-route to Ireland

9th May 2007

The container of tractors which will participate in the Irish World Record attempt has arrived in the United Kingdom. The pictures show Phil Upshall, one of the UK's most experienced vintage tractor collectors and enthusiasts, assisting with the offloading of the Marshall 18-30, the Field Marshall Series III, and the Emerson Brantingham Big 4-20. These tractors will travel by road from the UK to Ireland prior to the event.
 
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HTN 198 - South Africa agrees to participate in Irish World Record Attempt

 

On 5th August 2007 Ireland will be hosting another attempt at the World Record for vintage and classic tractors. Modelled on the original World Record attempt held at Sandstone Estates in 1999, this event will attempt to exceed the number of tractors deployed by the United Kingdom last year.
There is some confusion relating to the definition of what is a participating machine, and the Irish have therefore agreed that a cut-off date of 1976 will be enforced.
Within this definition the Irish would need to field 1004 tractors pre 1976 in order to take the World Record.

The debate over what constitutes a viable World Record will undoubtedly continue but John Hanlon, who initiated the event, and his excellent and well motivated group of event organisers are adamant that they intend to stick to the rules and make this a genuine heritage event rather than just an attempt to get as many tractors of whatever age they can into one field at one time.

The Sandstone Heritage Trust response to this is very positive. A number of tractors have already been shipped. Two of these, the Emerson Brantingham Big 4-20 and the General Ordnance (GO) tractor, both participated in the Australian World Record attempt at Cootamundra and will effectively fly the flag for South Africa . A Field Marshall Series III, a Hart Parr 18-36, and a Marshall 18-30 complete the line-up of machines that will potentially participate in the event.

We call upon all men and women of goodwill within the vintage tractor movement worldwide to support the Irish attempt and if possible to be there in person, and even better still to take your tractor with you.
   
For further details contact:
 
Joanne West This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Sunday 05 August
Cooley Show
County Louth, Republic of Ireland.
Guinness world record attempt - Irish Vintage Tractor Working Challenge.
The Holiday Company, Manchester, Tel: 08454 303 404.
Weekend trip (Sat & Sun two nights) Carrickdale Hotel and Leisure Complex.
Contact The Secretary, Rob Rushen-Smith. Tel or Fax: 01394 275120
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
See our main advert page here
 
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Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 197 - The Sandstone Heritage Trust Marshall MP6 is complete!

23rd March 2007

After seven years the Sandstone Heritage Trust Marshall MP6 is complete.

The 1958 Field Marshall MP6, Serial No. 15939, is now complete and working. Chris Wilson handled the restoration with the assistance of others. Our particular thanks go to Chris for all his hard work and to Charles Viljoen and Zach van Staden for their assistance.

An admirable edition to the Sandstone Heritage Trust Vintage Tractor & Engine collection.
 
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Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 194 - Dorset Steam Fair August 29 - September 2 2007 - 40th anniversary - Tractors wanted!

20th March 2007

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Contact:
Scott Lambert
e: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
t: 01959 543502 (Direct)
Kelsey Publishing Group
Cudham Tithe Barn
Berry's Hill
Cudham
Kent
TN16 3AG
t: 01959 541444 (Switchboard)
f: 01959 541400

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 193 - We felt we should share this with our vintage tractor friends

20th March 2007

We felt we should share this with our vintage tractor friends...
 
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Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 189 - The Rhys Rolfe / Rhys Evans Tractor collection comes to Sandstone.

12th March 2007

As a result of an agreement entered into between the Sandstone Heritage Trust and the Rhys Evans Group the wonderful collection of tractors assembled over many years by Rhys Rolfe, who is a doyen of the South African
farming scene, will be incorporated into the Sandstone Heritage Trust tractor collection. Much the same way as the superb collection of International Harvester products which had been assembled by Jannie du Toit in the Western Cape were incorporated, so the rhys Rolfe collection will be merged and displayed.

The collection will maintain its identify and there will be some rationalisation between the current collection and Rhys Rolfe's collection. However, there are not many duplicates. The collection incorporates many
outstanding tractors which have been lovingly looked after over many years. Rhys is retiring during 2007 and the idea is that his tractors will be viewed by a wider audience and that he will be able to participate in activities involving his machines on a regular basis.

Our photographs show one of the many loads that are currently being assembled in Viljoenskroon for transport to Hoekfontein in the Eastern Free
State.
 
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HTN 187 - Article linked to our teff seeder, with thanks to Jerry Evans!

We recently put up a picture of an interesting item which we were trying to identify. The answer came back quickly - it is a teff seeder. Jerry Evans has submitted the attached article which is well worth reading. Apologies for our international web site readers for the fact that it is in Afrikaans. It would not work if we tried to translate it anyway.
 
 

Sandstone Heritage Trust - News

HTN 186 - Kelsey tour group has a successful visit to the Sandstone Heritage Trust

22nd February 2007

The Tractor & Machinery Holiday Club group, part of the Kelsey Publishing organisation group of companies, visited Sandstone Estates as part of their extensive tour of heritage facilities in South Africa. Members of the group included citizens from the United Kingdom, Canada and New Zealand. The group arrived on Sunday morning (18th) and were invited to participate in a wide variety of ongoing activities. Traction engines, a Sentinel S4 Steam lorry, vintage tractors, traditional Afrikaner oxen, and of course the well-known Sandstone Narrow Gauge 2-ft railway were all in operation. We were impressed by the way in which members of this tour group got involved and participated in many aspects of the weekend's activities.

Probably for many the highlight of the day was the double headed Garratt, NGG 16, No. 153 and the NGG 13, No. 49, hauled mixed freight train which left Hoekfontein Station at 17h30 for a complete trip around the entire system. Photographic conditions were good but the train did return after dark due to a broken coupling that had to be sorted out en route.

Fortunately the visitors took all these things in their stride and being collectors and preservationists themselves appreciated the fact that many of the items that they were enjoying were well over 100-years old.
Our thanks to all who participated and particularly the Sandstone Estates management and staff who worked tirelessly to ensure that this particular group enjoyed what was on offer.

The combined expansion of Pretoria to the south and Johannesburg to the north have almost entirely surrounded the farm with high density housing. However, life goes on very much as it did 40-years ago. Our picture shows the group posing in front of a Field Marshall Series II, an Emerson Brantingham Big 4-20, and a Field Marshall Series III. A Massey Ferguson 35 is obscured from view.

A working demonstration was given. Charles Viljoen is shown on a John Deere Model A and Wilfred Mole on a Field Marshall Series III. The group has now completed their tour of South Africa and are on their way
home.
 
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